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Morris College professor helps teachers, women and college students prepare for the future

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Dr. Cathine Gilchrist Scott

Dr. Cathine Gilchrist Scott, a former Dean of Education, Professor Emerita, Prominent Educator, an Educational Consultant, and a World Traveler, has published several articles on teacher preparation, leadership, and student achievement. She has a new publication in the 2019 edition of the Journal of the National Association of University Women, entitled, “A New Vision for Changing the Preparation of Future Teachers.” She contends that institutions of higher education that educate and train prospective teachers should make two broad, transformational, and visionary changes to improve teaching and learning. These changes include: (1) Offering a Master’s Degree in Teaching and Learning and (2) Changing the students’ course of study to focus on the integration of what to teach (Curriculum), how to teach (Instruction), how to assess student learning (Assessment), and how to effectively manage the classroom (Classroom Environment).

In addition, Dr. Scott has a publication, entitled, “Black Women and Retirement Security,” in the 2019 edition of the Journal of the National Positions Papers of the National Association of University Women. She contends in this article that in general, Black Women seem to retire too early and do not have enough money to keep them out of poverty, much less do some of the things they said they wanted to do when they retired, like travel. Dr. Scott said that Black Women do not need to retire too early if they are still productive and healthy; however, when they do choose to retire early, they should make sure that they have a lucrative retirement plan.

Dr. Scott also has an article in print entitled, “Soft Skills: The Keys to College Graduates’ Success in the Workforce.” It will be published in the 2020 edition of the Journal of the National Association of University Women. She contends that all college graduates must be proficient in soft skills to be productive in the world of work. She pointed out that employers seem to think that their employees must (1) have effective leadership skills, (2) communicate effectively, (3) think critically, (4) make decisions, and (5) work well with others. These soft skills are needed for high performance and productivity in the workforce.

Dr. Scott’s book, entitled I Want to be a Teacher, outlines her life as a successful teacher and tells young and veteran teachers how they can become great teachers. All prospective teachers should read her book. It can be purchased through www.ArchwayPublishingCompany.com.

Dr. Scott holds a Doctorate of Philosophy Degree (Ph.D.) in Leadership and Administration from the prestigious American University, Washington, DC, a Master of Education in Early Childhood and Elementary Education from the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia, along with extensive training and development in leadership, education, and program evaluation.

Dr. Scott is an active member of several organizations, including Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., the National Council of Negro Women, the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, the National Association of University Women, and the Order of Eastern Star. She is currently a Professor of Education at Morris College, Sumter, South Carolina where she continues to educate, train, and develop prospective teachers.

For more information, Dr. Scott can be contacted at drcgscott@gmail.com.

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